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12.1.16: Effects of Different X-ray Wavelengths

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    18381
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    All X-ray patterns seen in this chapter were obtained using a copper X-ray tube that produced Cu radiation with wavelength 1.5418Å. Sometimes mineralogists use other kinds of tubes that produce a different X-ray wavelength. If so, the angles of diffraction will be different. The diffraction pattern will look the same but will be systematically shifted to higher or lower values. Nevertheless, when we calculate d-values using Bragg’s Law, the values come out the same no matter the X-ray tube and radiation used.


    This page titled 12.1.16: Effects of Different X-ray Wavelengths is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Dexter Perkins via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.

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