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60.1: Introduction

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    22858
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    Geologic maps are maps that depict the rock units that crop out at Earth’s surface. Typically, they use different colors (or different fill patterns) to distinguish between different geologic units (or formations). Units (members, formations, groups, supergroups, etc.) meet at contacts, which can be of several varieties. To make relationships between rock units more clear, many geologic maps include cross-sections, which show a conceptual “slice” through the Earth along a straight line or multi-segment “polyline” on the map. The patterns that rock units (formations) make can convey key information about the geologic history of a region.


    This page titled 60.1: Introduction is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Callan Bentley, Karen Layou, Russ Kohrs, Shelley Jaye, Matt Affolter, and Brian Ricketts (VIVA, the Virginia Library Consortium) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.