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3.5: Strength and Breaking

  • Page ID
    17573
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    The color and shape of minerals are obvious to anyone, but mineralogists note other, more subtle, properties too. Several relate to the strength of bonds that hold atoms in crystals together. These properties are especially reliable for mineral identification because they are not substantially affected by chemical impurities or defects in crystal structure.


    This page titled 3.5: Strength and Breaking is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Dexter Perkins via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.

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