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16: Volcanic Processes and Landforms

  • Page ID
    15199
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    Learning Objectives

    By the end of this chapter you should be able to:

    • Draw and label a simple diagram of the features associated with a volcanic cone.
    • Explain the distribution of volcanic activity across the Earth.
    • Describe the features of effusive and explosive eruptions.
    • Describe the hazards associated with volcanism.

    Volcanoes are a window into the heart of the Earth's dynamic interior. Born of molten rock from deep within, volcanoes represent the ever recycling nature of the solid Earth. Awesome displays of fiery fountains of molten rock and massive eruptions of gases and ash impose a significant danger to human habitation in volcanically active regions. In this chapter we'll explore where volcanoes occur, how they are formed, and hazards they pose to humans.

    Thumbnail: Mount St. Helens in eruption. Aerial view of upper part of volcano. Eruptive column, ash cloud, ash flows below rim of crater. (Courtesy USGS)


    This page titled 16: Volcanic Processes and Landforms is shared under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Michael E. Ritter (The Physical Environment) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.

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