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Physical Geology (Huth)

  • Page ID
    6055
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    The Earth is an active planet shaped by dynamic forces. Such forces can build mountains and crumple and fold rocks. As rocks respond to these forces, they undergo deformation, which results in changes in shape and/or volume of the rocks. The resulting features are termed geologic structures. This deformation can produce dramatic and beautiful scenery, as evidenced in the figure of above, which shows the deformation of originally horizontal rock layers.


    Physical Geology (Huth) is shared under a CC BY 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Anne Huth.