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13.3: Photosynthesis

  • Page ID
    10351
    • Contributed by Miracosta Oceanography 101
    • Sourced from Miracosta)

    Photosynthesis

    Green plants, algae, and some bacteria use sunlight to synthesize foods from carbon dioxide and water. These organisms thrive with sunlight with minimal nutrient requirements. They use water and the energy of sunlight to convert atmospheric CO2 into organic compounds—a process called carbon fixation. A bi-product is oxygen (O2) released into water, and eventually, the atmosphere.

    Photosynthesis
    in plants generally involves the green pigment chlorophyll (but also other colors and compounds) and generates oxygen as a byproduct. The process is:

    6 H2O + 6 CO2 = C6H12O6 (glucose) + 6O2

    In the oceans, photosynthesis is completed by microscopic and macroscopic plants.

    Chlorophyll
    Figure 13.4. Average sea-surface chlorophyll concentrations around the world (1998-2006). Most productivity is near coasts.