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12.13: Shoreline Erosion Problems

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    10344
    • Contributed by Miracosta Oceanography 101
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    Shoreline Erosion Problems

    Shoreline changes quickly with natural forces; they are not a stable landforms. Coastlines, especially on the East Coast and Gulf regions, are constantly changing, especially from the impacts of superstorms. These coastal regions are underlain by unconsolidated sediments that are easily eroded by strong currents. They remain relatively stable, as long as there is a new supply of sediment to replace materials eroded by longshore currents, tides, and storm waves. Figure 12.45 illustrates how much shorelines can change. In less than two centuries, Fire Island's eastern spit has grown about 5 miles (8 km) longer. The sediments creating this new land came at the expense of coastal lands father east on Fire Island, making the island increasing narrower. Barrier Islands are prone to be breached by storm erosion, creating new inlets, and filling in others.

    Many attempts have been made, often at great expense, to try to prevent the effects of erosion and deposition along coastlines. Common construction efforts include jetties, groins, and seawalls to protect harbors, infrastructure, and communities.

    Fire Island-Robert Moses State Park
    Figure 12.45. Fire Island (on Long Island, NY) has steadily grown about 5 miles (8 km) longer since 1825 by longshore drift (see Figure 12.40). Fire Island Inlet at the west end of Fire Island is scoured by rip tides, adding sediments to the tidal delta in Great South Bay.