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5.3.8: Summary

  • Page ID
    5923
  • Overview

    Earthquakes result when elastic strain builds up in the crust until the strength of the crust is exceeded, and the crust ruptures along a fault. Some of the fault ruptures do not reach the surface and are detected only by seismograms, but many larger earthquakes are accompanied by surface rupture, which can be studied by geologists. Reverse faults are less likely to rupture the surface than strike-slip faults or normal faults. A special class of low-angle reverse fault called a blind thrust does not reach the surface but does bend the rocks at the surface into a fold called an anticline. Paleoseismology extends the description of contemporary earthquakes back into prehistory, with the objective of learning the slip rate and the recurrence interval of earthquakes along a given fault.

    In the last century, earthquakes have been recorded on seismograms, with the size of the earthquake, its magnitude, expressed by the amplitude of the earthquake wave recorded at the seismograph station, and the distance the earthquake is from the seismograph station based on the delay in arrival time of slower shear (S) waves compared to compressional (P) waves. A problem with measuring earthquake size in this way is the broad spectrum of seismic vibrations produced by the earthquake orchestra. A better measure of the size of large earthquakes is the moment magnitude, calculated from the area of fault rupture and the fault displacement during the earthquake. In addition to magnitude, seismographs measure earthquake depth and the nature and orientation of fault displacement at the earthquake source.

    Earthquake intensity is a measure of the degree of strong shaking at a given locality, important for studying damage. Information from a dense array of seismographs in urban areas, when combined with fault geology and surface soil types, permits the creation of intensity maps within five minutes of an earthquake, which is quick enough to direct emergency response teams to areas where damage is likely to be greatest. Based on the better knowledge of the Earth’s crust in well-instrumented areas, it is even possible to determine the magnitude of earthquakes that struck in the pre-seismograph era.

    Tectonic geodesy, especially the use of GPS, allows the measurement of the long-term buildup of elastic strain in the crust and the release of strain after a major earthquake. If geology records past earthquakes and seismography records earthquakes as they happen, tectonic geodesy records the buildup of strain toward the earthquakes of the future.